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Algae Has Bright Future in Animal Feeds

Posted by Algix in In the news | 0 comments

06.08.15

Algae seaweed as fish feed US - Scientists investigating the use of algal byproducts for feed have found that a novel algae meal derived from heterotrophic microalgae makes a suitable feed for cattle. Algae are organisms so environmentally adaptable that they flourish in wastelands, sewage and saline bodies of water. They can grow in high densities, in the dark and in the presence of high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphates. Harnessing the adaptive power of algae is a relatively new research field. Engineers across the country have developed algal biofuels, food additives and skincare products. Livestock scientists see its potential as a sustainable, high-energy feedstuff as well as a protein supplement. Amongst those scientists are Dr Megan Van Emon, Assistant Professor at Montana State University, Dr Daniel Loy, Professor of Animal Science at Iowa State University and Dr Stephanie Hansen, Assistant Professor at Iowa State University. Their paper, "Determining the preference, in vitro digestibility, in situ disappearance, and grower period performance of steers fed a novel algae meal derived from heterotrophic microalgae," is featured in June's issue of the Journal of Animal Science. Solazyme is a company that transforms algae into products like biofuel, cosmetics and cooking oil. They modify heterotrophic algae, which normally produce 5-10 per cent oil, to produce 80 per cent oil. The organisms are grown and processed in controlled media under very specific conditions. The oil is then harvested and incorporated into a variety of tailored products. The organization approached Dr Stephanie Hansen and her colleagues to assess the value of the remaining algal fraction, the dry cell wall that would otherwise be burned as waste. "We looked at the nutrient analysis of a blend of deoiled algae and soyhulls," said Dr Hansen. "Everyone thought that this could be a great ruminant feedstuff." While previous studies have studied pure algae supplements as sources of protein or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the current study is the first to feed a unique algae meal blend (ALG). The feedstuff (57 per cent microalgae) has slightly more fat content than corn, the same amount of protein and does not contain DHA. A preliminary experiment tested the DM digestibility of ALG compared with hay and soyhulls. Three more experiments took place (1) to determine if cattle would readily consume algae meal, (2) to determine the influence of DM disappearance of ALG and other feedstuffs and (3) to determine growth and DMI of ALG-fed grower calves. Four diets were fed to feedlot steers: a cracked corn control diet, and diets containing 15 per cent , 30 per cent and 45 per cent algae meal (CON, ALG15, ALG30 and ALG45, respectively.) The first two experiments involved three ruminally cannulated steers, and the third experiment involved 48 grower steers. In the grower study algae meal replaced wet corn gluten feed in the diet. The trials yielded a myriad of new information, notably:

  • Cattle readily consumed algae meal at all concentrations without sorting. (1)
  • ADG increased as ALG increased in the diet. (3)
  • DMI increased linearly as ALG concentrations increased in the diet. (3)
  • Finally, midpoint and final BW of steers were not affected by ALG. (3)
Dr Hansen says this initial collection of data translates to a promising future for algae meal. "We are currently working on FDA approval for the product," Dr Hansen said. "Hopefully by 2016, cattlemen will be able to start incorporating it into rations, especially if they can find it at the right price." The research team is working together with Solazyme to determine the financial value of algae meal. Dr Hansen expects the high-energy feedstuff to be priced competitively with corn. While most research initiatives are still in the experimental stages, continued studies on microalgae means commercial production of algal products is in the near future. DrHansen and her colleagues recently completed two sheep digestibility projects where algae meal directly replaced soyhulls and corn. Those projects will be presented at the ADSA-ASAS Joint Annual Meeting next month with M.S. candidate Rebecca Stokes as the lead author. "The sustainability of algae production is pretty promising," Dr Hansen said. "As we move into the next generation of cattle feeding and feedstuffs, it will be interesting to see where present and future versions of algae meal place themselves in the market." - See more at: http://www.thefishsite.com/fishnews/26076/algae-has-bright-future-in-animal-feeds/#sthash.nPNHnJFf.dpuf

 

Going green: Microalgae as a feedstuff for grower steers

Posted by Algix in In the news | 0 comments

Algae byproduct meal proves to be excellent feedstuff for growing beef cattle

Algae are organisms so environmentally adaptable that they flourish in wastelands, sewage and saline bodies of water. They can grow in high densities, in the dark and in the presence of high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphates. Harnessing the adaptive power of algae is a relatively new research field. Engineers across the country have developed algal biofuels, food additives and skincare products. Livestock scientists see its potential as a sustainable, high-energy feedstuff as well as a protein supplement. Amongst those scientists are Dr. Megan Van Emon, Assistant Professor at Montana State University, Dr. Daniel Loy, Professor of Animal Science at Iowa State University and Dr. Stephanie Hansen, Assistant Professor at Iowa State University. Their paper, "Determining the preference, in vitro digestibility, in situ disappearance, and grower period performance of steers fed a novel algae meal derived from heterotrophic microalgae," is featured in June's issue of the Journal of Animal Science. Solazyme is a company that transforms algae into products like biofuel, cosmetics and cooking oil. They modify heterotrophic algae, which normally produce 5-10% oil, to produce 80% oil. The organisms are grown and processed in controlled media under very specific conditions. The oil is then harvested and incorporated into a variety of tailored products. The organization approached Dr. Stephanie Hansen and her colleagues to assess the value of the remaining algal fraction, the dry cell wall that would otherwise be burned as waste. "We looked at the nutrient analysis of a blend of deoiled algae and soyhulls," said Hansen. "Everyone thought that this could be a great ruminant feedstuff." While previous studies have studied pure algae supplements as sources of protein or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the current study is the first to feed a unique algae meal blend (ALG). The feedstuff (57% microalgae) has slightly more fat content than corn, the same amount of protein and does not contain DHA. A preliminary experiment tested the DM digestibility of ALG compared with hay and soyhulls. Three more experiments took place (1) to determine if cattle would readily consume algae meal, (2) to determine the influence of DM disappearance of ALG and other feedstuffs and (3) to determine growth and DMI of ALG-fed grower calves. Four diets were fed to feedlot steers: a cracked corn control diet, and diets containing 15%, 30% and 45% algae meal (CON, ALG15, ALG30 and ALG45, respectively.) The first two experiments involved three ruminally cannulated steers, and the third experiment involved 48 grower steers. In the grower study algae meal replaced wet corn gluten feed in the diet. The trials yielded a myriad of new information, notably: -Cattle readily consumed algae meal at all concentrations without sorting. -ADG increased as ALG increased in the diet. -DMI increased linearly as ALG concentrations increased in the diet. -Finally, midpoint and final BW of steers were not affected by ALG. Hansen says this initial collection of data translates to a promising future for algae meal. "We are currently working on FDA approval for the product," Hansen said. "Hopefully by 2016, cattlemen will be able to start incorporating it into rations, especially if they can find it at the right price." The research team is working together with Solazyme to determine the financial value of algae meal. Hansen expects the high-energy feedstuff to be priced competitively with corn. While most research initiatives are still in the experimental stages, continued studies on microalgae means commercial production of algal products is in the near future. Hansen and her colleagues recently completed two sheep digestibility projects where algae meal directly replaced soyhulls and corn. Those projects will be presented at the ADSA-ASAS Joint Annual Meeting next month with M.S. candidate Rebecca Stokes as the lead author. "The sustainability of algae production is pretty promising," Hansen said. "As we move into the next generation of cattle feeding and feedstuffs, it will be interesting to see where present and future versions of algae meal place themselves in the market." Story Source: The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Society of Animal Science. The original item was written by Jacquelyn Prestegaard. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150721162458.htm

Clean Power Plan brings new opportunities for US algae biomass cos

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04.08.15

ABO-Clean Power Plan 1

August 4 (SeeNews) - The Algae Biomass Organization (ABO) welcomed the US’ Clean Power Plan and especially the part of it related to the use of qualifying carbon capture and utilisation (CCU) technologies to cut emissions from power plants. The final version of the federal regulation says that states may allow Electric Generating Units (EGUs) affected by the Clean Power Plan to turn to CCU in order to meet the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission targets. ABO said this is “a huge win for the algae industry”. There are several US companies commercialising algae-based technologies that turn CO2 from power plants into fuels, feeds and other products. CCU will not only cut the cost of emissions reduction for both utilities and power consumers, but will also create a new revenue stream, the ABO noted. The Clean Power Plan, presented Monday, aims to reduce CO2 emissions in the US by 32% from 2005 levels by 2030. Under the new regulation, each state has a separate target and is obliged to formulate its own plan to address greenhouse gas emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants. Source: http://renewables.seenews.com/news/clean-power-plan-brings-new-opportunities-for-us-algae-biomass-cos-487024

Turkey’s Tuz Gola Lake Turns Red Because of Toxic Algae Bloom

Posted by Algix in In the news | 0 comments

02.08.15

Salt lake Turkey 1

Like a scene straight out of a horror film, a Turkish lake known for its salinity turned a deep shade of red recently.

The country's Tuz Gola – nicknamed "Salt Lake" by the locals – turned red because of a large Dunaliella salinas algae bloom, ABC News reported. The lake, which is Turkey's second largest, spans more than 600 square miles and is among the lakes with the highest salinity levels worldwide, according to the United Nations.

In the slideshow at the top of this page, you can see an image of what the red algae bloom looks like, as well as photos of other toxic algae blooms around the world.

"Because the lake is losing water, the salinity is getting higher and higher, which kills off a lot of the plankton that normally eat this red algae," Stony Brook University marine ecology research professor Dr. Christopher Gobler told ABC News. "So now, the algae is thriving and will probably red until the lake fully evaporates, probably next month during the peak of summer heat."

The lake is a popular spot for tourists because as the lake dries out, it becomes a walkable salt flat, the New York Daily News said. There are also industrial refineries along the lake that capture salt from Tuz Gola.

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Salt lake Turkey 3

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

AKSARAY, TURKEY - JULY 16: A view from the "Salt Lake" in Aksaray, Turkey on July 16, 2015. Dunaliella salinas, a type of halophile micro-algae especially found in sea/lake salt fields, colorize a part of the lake this season of the year. (Photo by Murat Oner Tas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Salt lake Turkey 6

http://www.weather.com/science/environment/news/turkey-toxic-algae-bloom-red-lake

http://mashable.com/2015/07/19/algae-turns-turkish-lake-red/

Arava grow seaweed on land: New superfood comes from the sea

Posted by Algix in In the news | 0 comments

01.08.15

Arava Seaweed 1 [Israel] Consumers are now used to seeing new information about how beneficial fruits and vegetables are to one’s health. But one of the healthiest items available may not even be a fruit or vegetable; it might be seaweed. “There is nothing in the world like seaweed,” said Omer Kamp of Arava Export Growers. “The nutritional value that it has is beyond comparison.” It can also add flavor to dishes without any of the bad sodium that can cause health risks. But while Kamp notes that it’s one of the healthiest items one can eat, the challenge has been to educate people on how to eat it. “We are still working on the consumers,” said Kamp. “They need to be educated, and it’s a process. People now understand that it’s healthy, but now they need to know what to do with it.” Arava is working with chefs throughout Europe to come up with recipes using seaweed and ideas on how to incorporate it into familiar dishes. Red seaweed, for example, can be used as a thickening and flavoring agent in soups, and green seaweed can be added to salads for additional nutrients. A promotional campaign with retailers is also in action, and though it’s been slow going, there has been progress. “Half a year ago, people didn’t even know what this product was or what it looked like,” said Kamp. “Now they know, and they want to get educated. But it’s a process and it’s going to take some time.” Arava production is eco-clean While there are other suppliers of seaweed selling the product in Europe, Kamp explained that Arava is unique in that its production is carried out in a controlled environment. A large pool just off the shore is filtered and contains sleeves filled with everything needed for seaweed to grow in a maintained environment. Kamp said they produce between 500 and 600 tons annually this way. Production that is done right out in the ocean can absorb unwanted compounds, but Arava’s controlled environment prevents that. Arava seaweed 2 “Seaweed is algae, and algae absorbs all of the elements that surround it, so you can get bad stuff out there and put it in your body,” said Kamp. “But we’re the only producer in the world that grows our seaweed in a controlled environment, so not only is it organic, but it’s also eco-clean.”

China’s algae crisis offers feedstock for U.S. plastics firm

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29.07.15

Lake Taihu 1

Lake Taihu, the third largest freshwater body in China, once was pure and beautiful and one of my fondest childhood memories. But like many things in China, it has fallen victim of GDP-focused development and now is devastated by pollution.

In the past couple of decades, explosive industrialization and urbanization have turned Taihu’s waters a freakish green with rampant algae blooms.

The crisis first made headlines in 2007 when millions of local residents found their tap water was like green Jello and were forced to find alternative drinking water. The government has since pumped billions of yuan into cleanup projects, but the effect has been very limited.

Local residents who resent these notorious algae didn’t know, however, these green matters could be a valuable feedstock for the polymer industry

Thanks to the discovery of an American company, Taihu algea are being processed into dry powder and shipped to the United States to make algae-based plastics.

Wuxi-based DLH (Delinhai) Tech Co. Ltd. said it has received an order from a U.S. customer to deliver 1,400 metric tons of algae powder in batches through the end of next year.

Hu Hangyu, who is in charge of the company, said in a phone interview that he was not at liberty to disclose the customer’s name.

Lake Taihu 2

The customer first approached DLH in 2013, according to DLH. The Wuxi-based company spent months on research to reduce moisture and in 2014 reached the customer’s requirement of less than 10 percent moisture content. It sent a test sample of 5 metric tons of powder to the customer in January.

DLH said the customer was very satisfied and placed the 1,400-ton order.

The United States has had its own algae blooms, but DLH said the Chinese waters are rich in nitrogen and phosphorus, which yield algae with high protein content (more than 35 percent).

DLH’s production line currently can produce 8 tons of powder per day, using 50 tons of algae collected from the lake, the company told Chinese media. It also said it would be able to consume all of the algae from Taihu if it were to expand to five lines.

DLH told local media that it’s selling the powder at $500 per ton with a thin profit margin. Nevertheless, it’s a higher value-added application than traditional uses like compost and biogas power generation.

Lake Taihu 3

Exporting is more profitable than selling in China, Hu told Plastics News, adding that he doesn’t know any company in China that converts algae into plastics.

Hu said he’s not considering bringing on algae-to-polymer technology and producing plastics locally.

“We are not a plastics producer. We specialize in algae collection and treatment and would not consider entering a new industry,” he said on the phone.

“The customer has their own proprietary technology. All we do is supply raw materials as specified by the customer,” he emphasized.

DLH has expanded its treatment area beyond Taihu to other regions in China.

 

Read more at: http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20150713/BLOG10/150719975/chinas-algae-crisis-offers-feedstock-for-u-s-plastics-firm

The world’s largest Haematococcus farm built in China

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27.07.15

China AXA 1 [China] The geological stone forest of Shilin is a set of limestone formations located in Shilin’s Yi Autonomous County, approximately 90 km (56 mi) away from the provincial capital city Kunming, Yunnan Province, People’s Republic of China. Since 2007, one of the most notable stone forest site, the Naigu stone forest, has been listed as the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Minutes away from the World Heritage site, there is an astonishing man-made structure where thousand of kilometers of glass tubes are put together for the cultivation of microalgae. This structure is known as the photobioreactor. Last month, Algae World News paid a visit to this microalgae production plant and met with the company’s founding team members. Upon our arrival in the morning of 16th of June 2015, we were received by 4 warm-hearted young men, who are the founders of the company. We are glad that the team eventually agreed to share their experience with Algae World News’ readers. The successful establishment of such mega-structure was not easy. We were impressed that the pilot plant and the 1,000 km commercial scale glass-made tubular photobioreactor was actually constructed without any help from the algae industry experts or algae research institution. China AXA 2 After many years of research in the algae and natural product industries, Eric Pan, the founder (now the technical director) of Yunnan GinkoAsta Biotech Co., Ltd., together with 2 of his ex-classmates, Fei Yang and Wei Xiang, demonstrated a pilot plant which produces a type of microalgae known as Haematococcus pluvialis, in year 2009. This was also one of the very first commercial prototype of H. pluvialis cultivation system demonstrated in China. “We started everything from scratch. I read hundreds of articles related to algae cultivation and production systems. We build our own lab, grow and acclimatize the algae, look for glass fabrication factory, construct the system, and secure investors. ” Eric recalled. In 2013, the team completed the first phase of the commercial H. pluvialisproduction plant. The 25 acre astaxanthin production facility features sealed glass tubes, which ensures a clean and contaminant-free environment for the growth of H. pluvialis.

Currently, operated by 80 emplyees, the facility is capable of producing 3 tons of pure astaxanthin per year and it is available for immediate shipment world-wide. "We are doubling the production by 2016. We believe that currently our company's astaxanthin production contributes 25% of the global astaxanthin market." Fei Yang stated.

China AXA 3

Fei Yang is the R&D manager of the company.

“We will be having our own on-site super-critical carbon dioxide extraction facility by next year. At the moment, we are sending the raw biomass product to Japan and Beijing for astaxanthin extraction and purification.” Fei Yang further elaborated. “Currently, Beijing Gingko Group (BGG), is one of the largest investor of our company. BGG is also the marketing arm of our company’s Haematococcus products such as astaxanthin. The product name “AstaZine” was registered and approved by the China’s Ministry of Health in year 2012 and it is now sold throughout the country as a health supplement.” Eric added.

BGG is one of the leading natural ingredients company in China which offer various kinds of natural ingredients to the marketplace.

In 2013, BGG initially invested in the purchase of over 25 acres of the most fertile and climatically suitable land in Shilin, and then invested in the photobioreactor technology to grow the microalgae for the production of natural astaxanthin. Astaxanthin is in short supply around the world, and BGG is now one of the leading producer in the Asian market.

According to algachina.com, in March 2013, Yunnan GinkoAsta Biotech So., LTD raised $10,000,000 as the initial construction capital, and then another $20,000,000 for further expansion in August of the same year.

"The market price of pure astaxanthin fluctuates around $12,000.00 per kilogram. The price is largely depending on its purity and its ratio to the total carotenoids." said Eric.

China AXA 4

In January 2014, world leading natural astaxanthin manufacturers Fuji Chemical Industry Co Ltd. (AstaReal®), Algatechnologies Ltd. (AstaPure®), and Cyanotech Corporation (BioAstin®, Nasdaq Capital Market: CYAN), announced the formation of “Natural Algae Astaxanthin Association” (NAXA), a trade organization dedicated to educating the public and dietary supplement industry about the health benefits of natural astaxanthin and the major differences among other sources. Wei Xiang, the director of administration department explained the market advantage of their company. The production facility is situated 1,800 meters above sea level. During the summer, the highest temperature recorded was 26 degree Celsius (which last for only a few days), and the average temperature throughout the year is 17 degree Celsius with abundant of sunlight. This is a perfect condition for the cultivation of H. pluvialis. “Our cultivation system requires only fine adjustment to cool down or heat up the system according to seasonal change. That save us significant amount of money for the production.” Wei Xiang said. China AXA 5 “We spent years to select a strain that grows fast enough and accumulates high amount of astaxanthin. Our selected H. pluvialis strain requires only 6 days of cultivation in its green motile stage. The culture is then put under stress for 9-14 days for the synthesis and accumulation of astaxanthin. Having a productive strain is the key of a successful and profitable microalgae cultivation plant.” Wei Xiang explained. The astaxanthin content of the selected strain of H. pluvialis reaches 7%. On average, H. pluvialis accumulates up to 5% of astaxanthin only. Achieving high astaxanthin concentration lowers the cost for the extraction and purification. “Together with the new super-critical CO2 extraction facility, we will be handling every step from upstream farming, harvesting, and extraction to downstream product development, marketing and branding. This is like an one-stop service station for astaxanthin production and we believe that this is our unique selling point.” Wei Xiang said. At the end of the meeting, the team members told us the future plan of the company. “We are currently collaborating with research institutions and we are exploring the commercial viability of other valuable microalgae species. The market of astaxanthin may reach saturation in 5-10 years time. Competitors are rising, technologies are becoming easily accessible, and we are always looking into solutions in longer run. Being innovative in terms of product development is the key to business sustainability.” Eric said. https://youtu.be/nYT_eN2IPfk Read more at: http://news.algaeworld.org/2015/07/the-worlds-largest-haematococcus-farm-in-china/  

Edible Algae as a Viable Protein Source

Posted by Algix in Uncategorized | 0 comments

24.07.15

Edible Algae Protein is an essential part of every person’s diet. While most of us get this vital nutrient through eating meat, vegetarians and vegans have to acquire it through alternative methods. Many food experts are now saying that algae, quinoa, and pulses are the next best available sources of protein. Choosing to eat algae, quinoa, and pulses over other forms of protein comes with several advantages. Eating these foods cuts down significantly on food waste, which is a big problem when it comes to eating meat or other foods that spoil quickly. Their preparation allows them to be much less processed as well, which contributes to the overall health of those who eat them.

Great variety of options

Algae is becoming a preferred protein source for vegans, since it has a greatly reduced carbon footprint and provides comparable protein to other vegan favorites, such as rice or soy. The total composition of algae consists of 63% protein, 15% fiber, 11% lipids, 4% carbohydrates, 4% micronutrients, and 3% moisture. These numbers indicate that algae is a food that is rich in nutrients and very healthy. Some consumers may be cautious to eat algae, but food scientist Beata Klamczynska explains that people are slowly beginning to recognize how good it can be. “Are consumers ready for algae as an ingredient? Yes, they are ready and excited about algae…The more they learn, the more excited they get. Just a little education eliminates any doubts….There are thousands of algae strains to choose from for a variety of products,” she said. Like algae, quinoa and pulses also exist in many different forms. There are currently over 1,400 quinoa products on the market, all of which are rich in protein. “Pulses” is just a general term that encompasses legumes, beans, chickpeas, and lentils, and the number of these products is also large. According to Anusha Samaranayaka, who is a scientist at POS Bio-Sciences, pulses are known to be high in protein, vegetarian, gluten-free, non-allergenic, non-GMO, and sustainable. Supplementing any of these different foods into your diet is a great way to increase your protein intake. A presentation on these three foods was recently shown at IFT15, which is hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Chicago.   Read more at: http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/algae-quinoa-and-pulses-are-great-alternative-sources-of-protein-071515.html

DIC Corp unveils state of the art spirulina extraction plant to meet growing demand for natural blue food color.

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22.07.15

DIC-Corp-unveils-state-of-the-art-spirulina-extraction-plant_strict_xxl

Tokyo-based DIC Corporation – which claims to be the world’s largest producer of spirulina – has finished building a $10m state-of-the-art extraction plant for the blue-green algae in southern California to meet growing demand for natural blue food colors-with commercial production expected to begin in September.

 

While other fruit-and vegetable-based natural blue colors have been available to US manufacturers for some time, demand for spirulina extract has surged in the part 18 months following moves by the FDA to approve its use in a wide variety of foodstuffs, said DIC.

 

“DIC estimates that the global market for natural blue food coloring will double between now and 2018, by which time it also expects the DIC Group’s share of this market to expand to 50%, from 20% at present.”

 

The new extraction facility – which will produce DIC’s Linablue natural blue food coloring from phycocyanin, a blue colorant extracted from spirulina using a water extraction process – is next door to the spirulina farm of DIC’s US subsidiary Earthrise Nutritionals, a leading player in the spirulina dietary supplements market.

 

Currently, DIC makes Linablue in Hainan Island in China, where it operates another spirulina production facility. However, having a second extraction facility in California will enable it to respond more effectively to demand in the US, said the firm, which has been operating at full capacity at the Hainan Island site for some time.

 

What is Spirulina?

 

A nutrient-rich blue-green algae that grows naturally in lakes in Africa and Central and South America, Spirulina contains more than 50 vitamins and minerals, including calcium and iron, and thrives in high-alkaline waters where other organisms cannot survive. It is also high in protein, fiber and gamma-linolenic acid.

 

Earthrise grows spirulina in water from the Colorado river, whih is pumped through canals to large settling ponds, through filters and into the growing ponds. The production system employs a closed-loop system where everything is recycled.

 

Clean water, carbon and nutrients are added daily to feed the algae, which is mixed by huge paddle wheels.

 

Read more at: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Suppliers2/DIC-Corp-unveils-state-of-the-art-spirulina-extraction-plant

OSU Researchers Unveil Superfood Seaweed That Tastes Just Like Bacon

Posted by Algix in In the news | 0 comments

20.07.15

irish-moss-and-pepper-dulse bacon seaweed                       Experts at the Oregon State University originally planned to grow high-quality abalone by feeding it with a new strain of algae. However, a business professor saw the potential of the patented seaweed as a superfood that surprisingly tastes like bacon. (Photo : Photo: Akuppa John Wigham | Flickr ) Experts from the Oregon State University (OSU) have developed a superfood that is made out of seaweed but surprisingly tastes like bacon. The unexpected mix of food elements was unveiled after a new strain of dulse, which is a red marine algae, was patented for the consumption of a sea creature. According to the experts, the bacon-tasting superfood is packed with protein, vitamins and minerals. The original objective of the project is to develop a superfood for abalone, says Chris Langdon from the OSU's Hatfield Marine Science Center. High-quality abalone is of utmost essentiality, particularly in Asia. The research team fed abalones with their patented dulse and later found that the growth rate was able to surpass the numbers indicated in the literature. Although there have been expressed interests towards the possibility of making dulse available for humans, the researchers focused on using it to feed the abalone alone. Dulse or Palmaria are wild seaweeds that grow along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. These sea resources may provide income as its dried form used as cooking ingredient can be sold by up to $90 per pound. The researchers at OSU developed and controlled a new strain of this algae, which had been budding in their laboratories for 15 years. The new strain resembles a red algae that have a translucent appearance, and is said to contain antioxidants and 16 percent of protein when dried. The possible feasibility of this new strain for other uses aside from abalone consumption started when Chuck Toombs, a faculty member in the College of Business at OSU saw the growing dulse in Langdon's office. He was then looking for a probable project for his students taking up business and when he saw the seaweeds in the bubbling containers, his interest set in. "Dulse is a super-food, with twice the nutritional value of kale," says Toombs. "And OSU had developed this variety that can be farmed, with the potential for a new industry for Oregon." Toombs then collaborated with OSU's Food Innovation Center. A team of product development specialists then used dulse as the main ingredient for a variety of new food items. Although dulse is highly nutritious, has a wide range of uses (dried or fresh) and can grow swiftly, making it a good candidate for economic purposes, Gil Sylvia, director of the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station at OSU's Hatfield Marine Science Center says no complete investigation had been made regarding its economic feasibility. Nonetheless, the Oregon Department of Agriculture awarded a grant to the research group for them to further study and investigate on dulse as a "specialty crop." With this, the team was able to collaborate with Jason Ball, who used to work for the University of Copenhagen's Nordic Food Lab, where he mentored chefs to use local products more efficiently. His main contribution to the team is his 'culinary research' chef's perspective, says Sylvia. At present, some chefs based in Portland are now looking at the potential uses of fresh dulse, and according to them, dulse may have significant applicabilities both as a raw seaweed or a food additive. The MBA students of Toombs are currently mapping out a marketing plan for a new series of specialty food items and studying the possibility for creating a new industry in the aquaculture sector.   Read more at: http://www.techtimes.com/articles/68892/20150715/osu-researchers-unveil-superfood-seaweed-that-tastes-just-like-bacon.htm